Projectors FAQ

SALES

SERVICE

PRODUCT INFO

SALES

Who do I call to arrange a demonstration or pricing of a Projector?

Call  Vision Enhancement  Ltd  directly on  0800 765 276  or email us at sales@nzvision.co.nz
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Why should I choose a Sanyo projector?

Sanyo is the world's largest manufacturer of LCD Projectors (17% of the global market).  They have a huge commitment to R & D spending, with a proud record in first to market innovations.  There projectors are manufactured in Sanyo's Japanese factories to the ISO 9001 standard.  A complete best-fit line-up.
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What should I consider when buying a projector?

Firstly, consider what the Projector will be used for - is your priority video or data? If video is your main criteria, Sanyo have a range of specialist Home Theatre units - the PLV models. For data Projectors, consider how big the room will be and how many people are going to be in the audience. These factors will determine the screen size. You will then need to consider how much ambient light will you have to contend with. As a rough guide under normal office lighting, 500 ANSI lumens per square metre of screen should give a bright and well-contrasted picture. Also ask the seller about their quality support services. At Vision Enhancement Ltd, we offer quality support for all of our epuipment hire and projector hire needs.


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What else should I think about when buying?

What you are going to present is important. If you have highly detailed images such as spreadsheets then you will need XGA resolution but if you only show large text like power point presentations or video and the budget is limited then consider buying SVGA.
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I want to run the projector for long periods of time such as in a training room. What advice can you give?

With projectors becoming smaller and brighter it is tempting to consider purchasing a 2000 ANSI lumen sub 3kg projector in the belief that this will be enough brightness to provide a good image. Whilst this is true, the mobile and ultra-portable projectors were never designed to dissipate the heat build up from running for such long periods. You would be better to consider investing in a larger portable style projector which with it's larger LCD panels and increased cooling capacity which will increase the projector's life and reduce the operating costs in lamps and service down time.
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Stuck or dead pixels, what are they?

Your display may have cosmetic imperfections that appear as small bright or dark spots. These imperfections are caused by one or more defective sub-pixels. This is common to all LCD displays used in products supplied by all vendors and does not indicate a faulty unit.
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SERVICE

What is the warranty period for Sanyo LCD projectors?

All Sanyo LCD projectors carry a two-year warranty on parts and labour and 90 days warranty on the lamp.
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Who do I call if I suspect my Sanyo LCD Projector requires service?

Call  Vision Enhancement  Ltd  directly on  0800 765 276  or email us at sales@nzvision.co.nz
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What could be the cause if my projector does not come on?

If the control panel lights on the projector come on, then the unit has power. More than likely the lamp assembly has died or is in the process of dying. Please replace the lamp assembly.
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What should I do if I believe the lamp failure is under warranty?

Call  Vision Enhancement  Ltd  directly on  0800 765 276  or email us at sales@nzvision.co.nz
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The image produced by my projector has purple or magenta dots on the screen.

Purple or Magenta dots are the result of dust or dirt particles that have settled on the LCD panels. The solution is to clean the LCD panels; an approved technician should do this. Please call  Vision Enhancement Ltd on 0800 765 276  for assistance. Regular maintenance of the air filter will reduce the likelihood that this problem will recur.
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My Projector powers off erratically. What is causing this?

This problem can be caused by an over heating problem caused by a clogged air filter. Please check and clean the air filter on a regular basis. If the problem is not corrected by doing so, then the projector may need service. Please call  Vision Enhancement Ltd on 0800 765 276  for assistance.
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The image produced by my projector has a coloured vertical edge on the left or right.

An Integrator lens assembly out of alignment typically causes this problem. The integrator lens performs the task of increasing the brightness and uniformity of the picture. If it is out of alignment, the integrator lens needs adjustment. Please call Vision Enhancement Ltd on  0800 765 276  for assistance.
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My remote mouse is not working.

The first thing to do is to check that the batteries in the remote are not old or exhausted. Assuming that the batteries are OK, the next step is to ensure that the proper cable was used from the projector to the PC. Finally, it may be necessary to turn off both the computer and the projector, then reboot the projector FIRST and then the computer
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PRODUCT INFO

What does LCD stand for?

LCD stands for Liquid Crystal Display. It is a display component most often found on notebook computer screens.
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What is a Liquid Crystal Display?

A panel that utilises two transparent sheets of polarising material with a liquid containing rod-shaped crystals between them. LCD panels do not emit light but are back lit with red, green or blue light. LCD projectors form an image by using a composite of the output from the separate red, green, and blue panels, which means greater control over each colour giving better uniformity and grey scale.
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What is DLP?

DLP projectors use a high-speed, rotating colour wheel to create an image, the projector reflects light off of thousands of micro-mirrors (one mirror per pixel). Portable DLP projectors can only display one colour at a time so moving images can suffer from an annoying rainbow patterning on the screen. In most single-chip DLP projectors, a clear (white) panel is included in the colour wheel along with red, green, and blue in order to boost brightest. This can reduce colour saturation, making the DLP picture appear not quite as rich and vibrant.
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LCD vs. DLP: Does it matter?

Today's portable projectors use two competing technologies discussed above: LCD (liquid crystal display) and DLP (digital light processing). For typical business presentations, either technology should be fine. But there are subtle differences. LCD projectors generally produce richer colours. LCD also produce better full-motion video and delivers a somewhat sharper image than DLP at any given resolution. The difference here is more relevant for detailed financial spreadsheet presentations than it is for video. This is not to say that DLP is fuzzy--it isn't. When you look at a spreadsheet projected by a DLP projector it looks clear enough. It's just that when a DLP is placed side-by-side with a LCD, the LCD typically looks a little bit sharper in comparison. Another benefit of LCD is that it is more light efficient. LCD projectors can produce significantly higher ANSI lumen outputs than do DLP with the same wattage lamp.
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What is the difference between a Data and a Video projector?

While all Sanyo projectors can display both data and video images well, they are optimised for displaying one or the other. Current Sanyo projectors with "PLV" in the model number are wide screen video models where contrast and colour reproduction are the best possible. Data projectors have "PLC" in the model and are normally required to show bright pictures so light output of the projector is increased at the expense of some contrast.
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What is an ANSI lumen?

An ANSI lumen is a measure of brightness put out by a projection device, as standardised by the American National Standards Institute. A brightness of 1000 ANSI lumens should project a good image on a screen 1.5m wide.
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How accurate are ANSI lumens measurements?

The ANSI rating is a good guide to indicate Projector brightness. However, the measurements publicised by manufacturers are based on their own ratings and are not independently tested. In practice this means that ANSI Lumens measurements from different manufacturers vary considerably. It is not uncommon for a lower rated unit from one manufacturer to outperform a higher specified Projector from another. The best solution always is to receive a demonstration from a Projector dealer and even if necessary have a shootout of competing models.
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So how many ANSI lumens do I need?

In general, the brighter the image a projector can produce, the more impact your presentation will have. For small groups of people in an office 1500 lumens is fine. As a rough guide under normal office lighting, 500 ANSI lumens per square metre of screen will give a bright and well-contrasted picture. Higher brightness allows larger images for presentations to more people. Bear in mind that the quality of the screen, it's size and the ambient light will have a dramatic effect on the image brightness. A demonstration by your dealer is the best way to make sure the projector will fit the job.
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What is contrast ratio?

Contrast is simply the difference between the brightest and the darkest parts of the image. Contrast helps define the depth of an image and is important when projecting video images. A good projector will have a contrast ratio of 300:1 or more. High contrast is useful when displaying high quality video in limited ambient light, but not as necessary when displaying simple computer data such as spreadsheets.
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How many hours will my projector lamp work?

For older model projectors (prior to year 2002), most lamps were rated approximately one thousand hours. The lamp's life however is affected by many things such as the air filters being cleaned regularly, ambient room temperature, allowing proper cool down time after use, also if the projector is moved while operating, the lamp is placed under abnormal stress and this reduces its life span. So while a majority of (but not all) lamps will meet the lamp life hours specified, some lamps will fail sooner and this is part of the normal variability .
Today ´s newer projectors feature lamps that may last for a longer period. Many multimedia projectors now offer two different lamp ratings in their specs. The lower number is the projector lamp life expectancy under normal use. There are also a higher number of hours offered if you use the projector in Eco-mode. By sacrificing a little brightness from the multimedia projector, you may add many hours to the life of your projector lamp. A good rule of thumb to save lamp hours is not to use more brightness than you need in any given situation. When the lamp replace light is illuminated on your projector or the projected image starts to dim it is time to consider replacing the lamp.
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What can I do to help my projector lamp last longer?

Do not allow the projector to become overheated. The number one cause of lamp failure is excessive heat. Follow the instructions in the user manual for powering down the projector to ensure that the projector has had an adequate cool-down period. Operate your projector in a clean, relatively dust-free environment. Clean air filters regularly. Utilise the "economy mode" if it is available with your projector model.
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What is keystone correction?

Key-stoning is when your image appears wider at the top or bottom due the projector being positioned somewhere other than the centre of the screen. Digital keystone correction corrects this rectangular distortion by resizing the image digitally. You should try if possible to position the projector to avoid using digital key-stoning as it always results in a slight picture degradation due to the rescaling involved.
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What is optical lens shift?

Optical lens shift moves the projector's lens physically in relation to the LCD prism. This will move the projected image either vertical or horizontally without keystone distortion (direction depends on the type of shift available). Projectors with this feature allow for a more flexible set up because the positioning of the projector is not fixed in relation to the screen.
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What is Power Zoom & Focus?

The Power Zoom and Focus found on some models are used to adjust the image size and focus by remote control and is motorised through the projector to get the desired image.
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What is an aspect ratio?

An aspect ratio refers to the dimensions of a television screen or other screen. The ratio refers to the width of the screen in relation to the height of the screen. The aspect ratio of today's traditional TV or computer monitor is 4:3 whereas HDTV has an aspect ration of 16:9.
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What is a universal power supply?

Universal power supply means the projector will automatically detect different voltage levels, such as 110 volts in the United States or 240 volts in New Zealand, and automatically adapt to them both. If you plan to travel with your projector in countries with different power systems, this is a must.
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What is resolution?

The resolution of your computer display measures the amount of detail that can be seen in an image expressed as the number of distinct horizontal and vertical lines visible on a test pattern. Computers have set resolutions, commonly called VGA, SVGA, XGA, SXGA, and UXGA.
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What is native resolution?

The panels in a LCD projector have a fixed resolution and work best when fed with a picture that has the same number of lines. The image quality benefits in matching the resolution of your projector to your source computer are considerable, as the projected image will then match your computer image pixel for pixel, giving the best possible reproduction. If the source has more lines than the Projector then some have to be thrown away, losing picture information, while if the source has too few the picture will not make full use of the projectors resolution. However, Sanyo projectors have advanced technology that automatically detects and resizes pictures seamlessly no matter what native resolution they are.
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What are VGA, SVGA, XGA and SXGA?

VGA in an acronym for Video Graphics Array. VGA, SVGA and XGA all measure the resolution of the video signal being output by a personal computer. VGA consists of 640 vertical lines x 480 horizontal lines, SVGA 800 lines x 600 lines, and XGA 1024 x 768, SXGA 1280 x 1024, and UXGA 1600 x 1200. XGA (1024 x 768) is the most common standard in laptop computers, and therefore the most popular Projector resolution as well.
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What is Anamorphic?

Anamorphically-enhanced DVD transfers offer the highest picture quality possible from the DVD format. Essentially, a conventional widescreen image is compressed horizontally when transferred to DVD, and uncompressed upon playback by a widescreen television or video projector.
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What is Progressive Scan?

Conventional interlaced television systems display one low quality video 'field' 50 times every second. Combined together, two fields make a single, perceptually higher quality, 'frame'. These fields/frames are shown so rapidly that the eye is fooled into believing it is viewing a high quality-moving image, not a succession of low-resolution still images. A progressive scan DVD or projector reconstructs complete frames. The result is a more natural, stable image, with fewer interlacing artifacts such as shimmering and flicker.
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What size screen should I use?

Choose a screen whose height will be about equal to 1/6 the distance to the back row of seats. So, if the back row is 10m from the screen then the screen height should be approx 1.6m.
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Can I use a plain white wall and save the screen expense?

Absolutely you can! You just won't get the best performance out of it. Projection screens have optical coatings that enhance their reflective properties. White walls don't. You can certainly use a wall if you want to, and you will get a watchable image. However, compared to the image you'd get with a screen, highlights will not be as brilliant, contrast and colour saturation will be reduced, and (depending largely on the texture of the wall) sharpness will be reduced as well. You will end up with an image that is not as good as your projector is capable of delivering.
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Are projectors ceiling mountable?

If you want to mount your projector on the ceiling, it will need the capability to project the image upside down. All Sanyo projectors will do this today.
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Can I get a mounting bracket to suit my projector?

Vision Enhancement Ltd can supply brackets to suit all projectors. Call us on 0800 765 276.
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Can I connect my laptop to the projector?

Connecting your computer and projector is relatively easy. Everything you'll need for a standard connection shipped with your data projector. When using a laptop it may be necessary to toggle between lap top monitor and the projector. This is done via the laptops key board (refer to the laptop manual)
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Can I project from my VCR or DVD player?

To connect your VCR, set top box or DVD player, you'll need an RCA cable, S-video cable or component video cable.
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What is a "composite input" on projectors?

A composite input is the connector most likely found on a standard VCR and is usually yellow in colour.
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What is S-Video (Separate Video)?

S-Video cable carries luminance or brightness (Y) and colour (C) information separately, rather than as a composite signal (in which all brightness and colour information is blended together). When transmitted together, colour and brightness information must be extracted from one another by the television, often resulting in picture artifacts such as 'dot crawl' and colour bleeding. When using a DVD player, S-Video cables are a must and provide a dramatic improvement in picture quality over composite RCA connections, and should be used if component video connection is not possible.
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What is a "component input" on projectors?

A component input is the preferred connector to be used with digital HDTV tuners. It works by dividing the chrominance signal into red, green and blue components and a separate luminance component. Connecting with the component input will improve picture quality and reduce noise by minimising crosstalk within the video signal.
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What is a "DVI input" on projectors?

DVI input is a digital input (rather than the standard analogue) and is a true plug and play input. It can also be used on some Sanyo projectors for optional devices such as wireless communication. Slowly but surely, the new DVI (digital video interface) standard is making its way into the display market and showing up in graphics cards. Projector vendors like Sanyo with an eye toward the future--and much sharper output--are selling projectors with DVI-I ports.
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Can Sanyo projectors display WiFi?

WiFi is a new computer standard, which is being increasingly accepted throughout the computer industry. It allows for the wireless transmission of data between notebooks and peripherals. Sanyo's latest range of ultra portable projectors will display images without annoying cables by attaching the optional Wireless Imager to the projector via the DVI port. Contact your dealer for more information.
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Can I leave my laptop in the office and still do presentations?

Yes, Sanyo Ultra Portable projectors with DVI input can use an optional Media Card Imager Kit that allows computer presentations to be down loaded to a PC card. See your dealer for more information.
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Can I view my computer monitor and the projected image at the same time?

Yes, you can if the projector has monitor out port but if not you could use a VGA splitter, which has two outputs between the computer and projector.
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We service all of New Zealand with AV equipment hire like Data and Video Projectors, Plasma and LCD screens , Slide projectors, Overhead projectors, Videos, Televisions, Laptops, Laser Pointers, Sound Systems, Microphones (including Lapel Mics), Digital Cameras, Projection Screens, Whiteboards and DVD Players.

If you live in Whangarei, Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, Rotorua, Taupo, Gisborne, Napier, Whanganui, New Plymouth, Palmerston North, Wellington, Nelson, Christchurch or Dunedin we can get AV equipment to you for purchase or hire. Contact us today!

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